Memory Management

Zen Digest

  • Outsource the task of remembering lots of short-term tasks
  • Be mindful of how you’re using memory (both technical and human)
  • 7 is the magic number of things we can remember

The Whole Picture

According to Miller’s Law, the human brain can store between 5 and 9 (most commonly 7) objects in short-term active memory.  I’ve always tried my best to be a man of my word, and in doing so, I needed to ensure that I remembered to do everything I agreed to do.  In business meetings, I did this by always taking notes.  I even have a system for marking items that are follow-up questions, tasks, etc.  But, in my personal life, it’s not very convenient to carry around a notebook and take notes during conversations – so I use my phone.

In a previous post, I noted about how I use an app called Any.do, which is a very simple task-management (really it’s just a list maker app) and it has been great for me to offload short-term memory management.  For tasks that are time-sensitive – “switch over the laundry” for example – I create a calendar item with a reminder.  An hour or so later, I get a notification that I need to move the laundry.  I free my mind from having to remember about the laundry.

This sort of outsourcing is wonderful as it not only frees up processing and storage in your brain, it also reduces stress – as you never have to worry about remembering little things (or worse, forgetting things).

Now we get technical.  Computers are similar to your brain in that they have two different types of memory – RAM (similar to short term) and a hard drive, similar to your long-term memory.  RAM is extremely fast, but much more expensive than a hard drive (as of writing this, you can get a 1,000 GB hard drive for $50 or 4GB of RAM for $45.  While 4GB is quite a bit of storage, it can get used up very quickly, especially when writing inefficient or sloppy code.  While web programming doesn’t give you much control over how to do memory management, the rules by which the browser does manage memory is well defined.

Whether you are programming or simply trying to remember a grocery list, it’s important to determine the best way to store that information to keep yourself and your code efficient.

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